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by Jonathan Maidstone, Product Manager, SAP September 15, 2003
SAP Professional Journal – 
This contains the names of selected CATT variables that have been renamed in eCATT, along with their eCATT equivalents.

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by Jonathan Maidstone, Product Manager, SAP September 15, 2003
SAP Professional Journal – 
This lists CATT commands and their eCATT equivalents.

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by Jonathan Maidstone, Product Manager, SAP September 15, 2003
SAP Professional Journal – 
Since its introduction in R/3 3.0, SAP customers have come to rely on the Computer Aided Test Tool (CATT) to test their centralized SAP installations and standard UIs. Testing distributed systems, controls-based UIs, and web applications, which are now commonplace in most installations, is a different story. To support these developments, SAP released the extended Computer Aided Test Tool (eCATT) as part of SAP Web Application Server 6.20. But what about all your existing CATT test procedures and modules? This article shows you how to safeguard your current CATT investment and leverage eCATT’s new capabilities by migrating your CATT objects to the new eCATT environment, leaving your CATT objects as-is in 4.6C and calling them remotely from eCATT, or doing both.

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by Jonathan Maidstone, Product Manager, SAP January 15, 2003
SAP Professional Journal – 

With SAP Web Application Server 6.20, the new extended Computer Aided Test Tool (eCATT) picks up where CATT leaves off. In addition to CATT's existing capabilities (the ability to record classic R/3 transactions, check and assign variables to fields, and create test cases), eCATT enables you to test controls-based and external transactions, use function modules with structured or tabular parameters in test scripts, write ABAP code directly in test scripts, and easily run an end-to-end test across your system landscape. This article introduces you to eCATT and details its most sought-after new function - the ability to test controls-based transactions.


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by Jonathan Maidstone, Product Manager, SAP March 15, 2001
SAP Professional Journal – 
The SAP DCOM Connector allows communication between an R/3 system and an external application via the "outside-in" approach, but there are times when you will actually need the process to work in the opposite direction. While this was possible in the past, it was by no means easy! Now, with Release 4.6D of the RFC SDK, there is a simple way to do this — via the generic RFC server COM4ABAP. This server, which is compatible with R/3 Release 4.0B and up, runs on Windows and allows you to instantiate and work with any COM component that is accessible from the machine on which the program is running. Furthermore, COM4ABAP takes care of type conversions between COM data types and the corresponding ABAP types. This article shows you how COM4ABAP handles data exchange between COM objects and ABAP programs. It outlines the infrastructure needed to communicate between R/3 and the COM4ABAP generic RFC server, and how to set it up as a service. It also demonstrates how to write a COM component and talk to it from an ABAP program, and provides some COM4ABAP programming shortcuts, as well as alternate ways of running multiple COM4ABAP server instances as standalone programs.

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by Jonathan Maidstone, Product Manager, SAP January 15, 2001
SAP Professional Journal – 
Screen programming and list programming used to occupy two different worlds. Controls programming changed that. The ALV Grid Control allows you to replace tabular lists with control-based tables on screens, and the SAP Tree Control provides a new way of displaying hierarchical lists. But how can you display unstructured output in a control-based environment? Starting with Release 4.6C, you display it with dynamic documents. A dynamic document is an HTML document you can construct in a program via ABAP methods, which allow you to add elements and content to the document on the fly while ensuring it has the right styles and colors to fit in with the rest of the system. This article provides an introduction to dynamic documents: how they fit into screens in the SAP system, and how you can use them for both simple output of text, pictures, or links, and for more complicated documents involving tables and forms for user interaction — in short, a brief overview of how you can move away from traditional list-bound output to create more compact and attractive user interfaces.