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by Susanne Janssen, Performance and Benchmark Group, SAP AG | Werner Schwarz, Development Team, SAP March 15, 2002
SAP Professional Journal – 
When you set out to design an application, you have several critical decisions to make - its functionality, user options, user interface, interfaces to other processes or systems, etc. Whether or not to build a parallel-processing option is one of these. This article helps you make this decision by providing criteria for evaluating whether parallel processing will benefit your program and whether your program can support this option. It also compares different parallel-processing distribution methods (fixed versus dynamic) and demonstrates why the first method that comes to mind (fixed) is often not the optimal choice. The authors discuss the design decisions involved and outline a comprehensive code framework for dynamic distribution of workloads to parallel processes.

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by Susanne Janssen, Performance and Benchmark Group, SAP AG | Werner Schwarz, Development Team, SAP January 15, 2002
SAP Professional Journal – 
Parallel processing is a built-in option available with many SAP programs that helps improve the throughput and processing time of business transactions that must process large amounts of data in a tight time frame. This article shows you how to determine whether parallel processing is the right course of action, how the workload is split up to achieve greater throughput, the options available to you to maximize performance, and how to use concurrent batch jobs when parallel processing is not an option automatically provided by the program. It also points out the two most common parallel-processing pitfalls and how to avoid them.

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by Susanne Janssen, Performance and Benchmark Group, SAP AG | Dr. Ulrich Marquard, Head, Performance and Benchmark Group, SAP AG May 15, 2000
SAP Professional Journal – 
A load test makes sense — in fact, it's an absolute must — for large, complex, or highly customized systems with add-ons. In these situations, a load test, whereby you physically test a heavily loaded system before it is deployed, is the only way to verify that the hardware sizing, configuration, and parameterization of your system will be powerful enough to support your business transactions with adequate response times and throughput. How do you know if your system requires a custom load test? The first part of this article shows you how to answer this question. And, supposing your system does warrant a custom load test, how do you proceed? What steps must you take to successfully devise and then execute the test? This article answers these questions as well.