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by Ameya Pimpalgaonkar, Senior SAP Architect September 17, 2010
SAP Professional Journal – 
Set your company portal apart from the rest by incorporating these six simple customizations. From adding your company logo to your SAP logon page to applying themes to enabling a hover effect that allows a user to easily see what nodes (sub menu) are contained within parent (header menu) nodes, you can make your portal inviting and usable.

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SAP Professional Journal – 
Most IT projects would not succeed without some kind of collaboration. SAP NetWeaver Portal allows users to work together through its Knowledge Management (KM) component, which contains the Content Management (CM) functionality that enables collaboration, and which integrates the SAP system’s search and classification engine (TREX) to provide customized search results. This article explains how KM, CM, TREX, and their underlying architecture support collaboration, and looks at three SAP tools that foster communication between local and remote users: Collaboration Rooms, the Universal Worklist, and Instant Messaging.

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by Patrick Dixon, Associate Partner, IBM Corporation September 15, 2005
SAP Professional Journal – 
Custom code, even just a little, can have a dramatic, beneficial result. For example, removing display-only fields that data-entry users don’t need can simplify an order form and speed up the data-entry process. Too much custom development, however, can leave you with a cumbersome system, too complicated to manage. Adding too many fields to an order form, for example, so all possible options appear on one screen, can overwhelm users and slow down the data-entry process.

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SAP Professional Journal – 
In light of SAP NetWeaver’s native support for ABAP, Java, and .NET, and the release of myriad new development tools, SAP teams now have a dramatically expanded menu of options for developing custom applications for delivery via SAP Enterprise Portal. This article is the second in a two-part series that compares the platform and skill set requirements, level of effort, and code complexity involved in your eight main custom development options. The first installment covered your best options for developing SAP-centric applications and straightforward Web applications that run exclusively in an SAP environment. This second installment covers the more complex options that are available for developing highly customized, cross-platform Java applications and applications based on ASP/.NET.

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by Patrick Dixon, Associate Partner, IBM Corporation January 15, 2005
SAP Professional Journal – 
- Before you can integrate SQL data into your SAP Enterprise Portal (SAP EP), you will need to install either an ODBC or a JDBC driver, or both, on your portal server (or servers). If you are using SAP EP 6.0, you will install a JDBC driver, since SAP EP 6.0 no longer supports the ODBC and ASP/.NET technologies. If you are running SAP EP 5.0, you will want to install both the ODBC and JDBC drivers for maximum flexibility.

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by Patrick Dixon, Associate Partner, IBM Corporation January 15, 2005
SAP Professional Journal – 
- Launch a third-party GUI using this short piece of code.

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SAP Professional Journal – 

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by Patrick Dixon, Associate Partner, IBM Corporation January 15, 2005
SAP Professional Journal – 
- When you are creating a Java iView with SAP Enterprise Portal (EP), many of the portal's wizards will ask you to select from a list of backend systems rather than let you specify connection criteria explicitly. To add systems to this list, or remove them, you need to maintain the system definitions. The steps you need to take to make such changes depend on whether you are using SAP EP 5.0 or 6.0.

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SAP Professional Journal – 
A portal that offers a single point of seamless access to various internal and external systems and content can save users a significant amount of time and frustration, and improve productivity. To achieve these benefits, however, users need to actually use the portal, and the key to getting users to use the portal is to provide the content that they need. The first installment in this article series showed you how to use the wizards, tools, and predeveloped business packages available for SAP Enterprise Portal 5.0 and 6.0 to integrate transactions, reports, and data from your SAP systems, including SAP R/3 and SAP BW, into your portal. This second installment shows you how to bring your non-SAP systems, including corporate email systems, third-party SQL databases, and Web-based content from intranet and Internet sources, into the fold.

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SAP Professional Journal – 
While the advantages of SAP Enterprise Portal (SAP EP) are most apparent in its features for end users, it provides equal benefit for developers and administrators through its suite of wizards, tools, and predeveloped iViews for integrating content from a variety of SAP, non-SAP, and Web sources. This article takes you on a guided tour of the options available in SAP EP 5.0 and 6.0 for integrating SAP transactions, reports, and data, to help you choose the right ones for rolling out SAP content and applications to your users. It points out their pros and cons, and how they can be used to integrate your existing SAP content and applications.